life in the Kearsarge area

what's happening in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area of NH

Archive for Newbury

Summer in NH

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Here I am, walking lakeside in North Sutton. Cell phone in hand, I snap a few photos of Kezar Lake, the dam and Wadleigh State Park.

It’s what I do most summers. I have time after dropping the kids off at their respective camps. I don’t particularly want to haul my laptop with me, so I take photos for Facebook, Pinterest and my enjoyment. I’ll include a few here to get you in the summer mood.

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Hanging out in Newbury

Why, oh, why, didn’t I bring a book? Then I would have stayed all day (well, I would have stayed for the two hours the parking lot allows me) at the public dock in Newbury, N.H. A gorgeous place to take a walk, catch some rays, gaze at the lake and enjoy a few moments of New Hampshire gorgeousness.

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The 82nd Annual Craftsmen’s Fair!

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It’s here! The longest-running annual crafts fair in the country scheduled for August 1-9 at the Mount Sunapee Resort in Newbury, N.H.

From modern to more traditional styles, the fair features more than 200 booths of fine craft, including colorful pottery, hand-blown glass, framed prints, beautiful bowls, decorative scarves, and handcrafted jewelry. The fair boasts daily craft demonstrations and workshops, fine craft exhibitions, free tours and seminars, and entertainment for the entire family. Along with a vast array of fine, handmade craft, this year’s Craftsmen’s Fair will have a special focus on children, with programs designed to help develop an interest in fine craft, including an all-day pottery school and lessons on the use of woodworking tools.

“The Annual Craftsmen’s Fair is a one-of-a-kind experience where visitors of all ages can explore how fine handmade craft inspires our lives,” said Jane Oneail, Executive Director of the League of NH Craftsmen. “Shop for distinctive, beautiful and functional fine craft that you cannot find anywhere else. Take part in one of the many workshops, such as printmaking or glass blowing. Talk one-on-one with craftsmen to learn about their techniques and inspiration. With a mix of longtime participating craftspeople and relative newcomers, the Fair is your chance to immerse yourself in the world of craft as you learn from some of the most renowned craftsmen in the country.”

Fair 1Kids-focused
With an extra emphasis on developing interest in the world of craft among the younger generations, the 2015 League of NH Craftsmen’s Fair will feature a “Tools for Kids” program. Under the guidance of experienced artists, children will get the chance to try out woodworking tools, with a special spoon carving program. In addition, the fair will host an all-day pottery school, where children can immerse themselves in pottery and make their own creations.

The “Next Generation” tent features work by children who are related to or sponsored by the League’s juried craftsmen. The Next Generation tent gives budding craftsmen the chance not only to showcase their work, but to gain valuable entrepreneurial experience.  Participating children learn to set up and arrange the tent, interact with customers, make sales and process transactions.

Fair Highlights
The Annual Craftsmen’s Fair features a series of demonstrations, workshops and seminars, including clay sculpting, beading, rug braiding and much more. Guests may also enjoy three fine craft exhibitions: CraftWear, the Sculpture Garden, and Living With Craft. Additional Annual Craftsmen’s Fair highlights include:

  • On Thursday, August 6, the fair will be open until 8 pm to give visitors more time to shop and enjoy the activities, and admission is only $5 after 4 pm.
  • A Collectors Seminar on Monday, August 3, will give experienced and aspiring collectors alike the chance to learn the ins and outs of collecting.
  • Fairgoers can purchase the League of NH Craftsmen’s 2015 annual ornament, Sweet Season, which is a hand-formed cast pewter maple tree adorned with a sap bucket. Kristine Lane and Paulette Werger, both juried in metal by the League, created this year’s ornament to celebrate New Hampshire’s springtime tradition of maple sugaring.
  • Visitors can learn more about their favorite craft with guided tours of the fair with a craftsman.  “The Artist’s Eye” tours offer visitors an insider’s perspective of craft on view, and fun, behind-the-scenes details of the oldest craft fair in the country.
  • The New Hampshire State Council on the Arts will sponsor an educational Fiber Arts tent featuring sheep and rabbits, along with demonstrations of traditional fiber techniques, such as weaving and quilting.
  • After a two-year hiatus, the League of NH Craftsmen is pleased to announce that the New Hampshire Art Association returns this year with artwork by members which will be displayed in the Spruce Lodge.
  • Enjoy a variety of strolling performances including oversized puppets, magicians, musicians, and much more!

Learn more at nhcrafts.org

Fun with history

Winter Kearsarge Magazine is going to press. It will be off my desk today, and printed next week. We haven’t run a funny history article since 2008…do you remember? It was based on the old Spy magazine “year in review.” The authors would take a funny item from the news, and make it even funnier with a title. So KM tried it with history items, true or tall tales. Here are a few oldies from 2008, and look for some new goodies in 2014.

Too cold to cry

Early log cabins near what is now the Newbury/Sutton line were very cold in winter. An open fireplace against one outside wall sucked all the heat from the far side of the room right up the chimney. Cold air was drawn in from outside through log walls. In 1780, William Gunnison and his reluctant wife moved into their cabin from the milder climate in Kittery, Maine. It was so cold the first night that Mrs. Gunnison’s hair froze to her pillow. We can understand why she might have shed a tear or two, but chances are she didn’t try again till spring.

Sorry to go on — I just really liked the hat

The Merrimack Journal in December 1874 records the following notice. “One of the most base and disgraceful acts ever committed in this orderly and decorous village was transacted at the [recent] Concert. Some vile person, unworthy of the name man or boy, had the impertinence, audacity and unqualified meanness to trample, spit tobacco juice upon and entirely annihilate Rev. Mr. Moody’s hat. Such conduct is not tolerated in this community, and the miscreant is sure to have the condemnation and reproach of the good people heaped upon him as soon as his name is found out, which if he has any shame could surely be done by the tingling of the cheek and his calling loudly for the rocks and mountains to fall upon him and hide him from the face of an indignant people.”

Better than a fat pig over a low pole

Hobos of the old days were not just men seeking a free ride. They were expected to perform for their supper and a spot in your barn — either with labor or with any skill they might possess. A free spirit named Jaquish is a good example. He came to Andover once a year, most often with a pig and a heifer in tow. His menu of services and their cost was as follows:

  1. Jumping heifer over a pole: 5¢
  2. Jumping pig over a lower pole: 2¢
  3. Praying for you or a loved one: 5¢
  4. Preaching: 15¢

Jaquish, apparently, was a worthwhile preacher. That is to say, his preaching had worth relative to that of a pig jumping over a low pole. The townspeople got used to — and even looked forward to — Jaquish’s arrival. He ambled through town in springtime for 20 years until 1845, when he didn’t.